New Hope’s Logan Inn makes history, sells for $5.6 million

Jersey City developer promises to restore, expand Bucks County landmark

Addison Wolfe Real Estate, a boutique real estate firm specializing in distinctive properties, today announces New Hope’s historic Logan Inn has sold for $5.6 million to Landmark Hospitality, headquartered in Jersey City, N.J.

According to Addison Wolfe Realtor® Caryn Black, who represented Landmark Hospitality, the Logan Inn deal represents the largest commercial real estate transaction in recent history within the borough of New Hope.

“This deal has been in the works for some time, and promises to remake the face of downtown New Hope while remaining true to the building’s historic roots and New Hope’s distinctive character,” says Black. “Landmark Hospitality has an impressive track record of restoring historic commercial properties and turning them into remarkable destinations that complement their environment. The same will be true of Logan Inn.”

Established in 1722 as a tavern, the Logan Inn at 10 West Ferry Street in New Hope is Bucks County’s oldest and only in-town, continuously operational inn on the National Register of Historic Places.

Frank Cretella, principal of Landmark Hospitality, intends to work closely with New Hope’s Historical Architectural Review Board and Doylestown Architect Ralph C. Fey, AIA, to enhance the property’s curb appeal. In its current form, Landmark’s plans call for constructing two additional permanent structures that will add 17 new guest rooms and a pebbled court yard.

“As we did with the Ryland Inn in Whitehouse Station a few years ago, our intention is to return the Logan Inn to its true landmark status,” explains Cretella. “Logan Inn has been a centerpiece for New Hope since the dawn of this town, and we intend to renew its promise, restore its history and remake it as a showplace of fine dining and lodging for the hundreds of thousands of people who visit the area annually.”

Landmark Hospitality, a leader in urban renewal and adaptive reuse practices for historic and existing commercial structures, also operates Liberty House Restaurant in Jersey City, Stone House at Sterling Ridge in Warren, N.J., and Celebrate at Snug Harbor in Staten Island, N.Y., in addition to the Ryland Inn. The company also recently unveiled its other distinctive New Hope property, the fully renovated Hotel Du Village on River Road.

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Ignorance Is Not a Brand Attribute

Media outlets everywhere have covered Groupon's Presidents' Day marketing stunt. The question is if this hurts or helps the brand in the long term.

Many media outlets, like the Chicago Tribune, have covered Groupon’s President’s Day marketing stunt. The question is if this stunt hurts or helps the brand in the long term.

As marketing tools, sometimes stunts work. They get the media’s attention. They take your brand “viral.” They get people talking about you. They create “buzz.”

When activists delivered a 13-foot tall gluten-free cake to Capital Hill in May 2011 to advocate that the Food and Drug Administration enforce gluten-free labeling standards, the stunt worked. There was plenty of media coverage. It supported the mission to which the activists were committed. It alerted consumers to issues surrounding the food they eat.

However, Groupon’s latest stunt – calling Alexander Hamilton “undeniably one of our greatest presidents” to promote a Presidents’ Day special – will not serve the brand well.

Sure, Groupon is quirky. Some might say it’s quirky to the point of being ridiculous. I’ll also grant you the Groupon stunt is getting buzz. There’s plenty of media coverage (heck, it prompted me to write this spiffy blog post).

But this stunt also gives the impression Groupon doesn’t know the facts (e.g., Hamilton was U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, not President). In trying to look too cool for school, Groupon instead comes across as out of touch with details – something that might make consumers wary. Thoughtful consumers might at first be amused. But on reflection, will they trust leaving their credit card information with a company that portrays ignorance as an attribute?

Hamilton’s briefly mistaken moment in U.S. presidential history won’t sink Groupon – assuming people are still using it. In fact, in the short run, it will have everyone talking about Groupon. That is what stunts do; they create buzz.

It’s the long run that is a problem. How does Hamilton fit the brand? More importantly, how does portraying a fundamental misunderstanding of history convince consumers to spend their Hamiltons, and Washingtons and Lincolns with Groupon?

Any good public relations professional will tell you buzz doesn’t always last and stunts like this don’t help the long term reputation of Groupon with consumers.

Mr. Hamilton would not be amused or impressed by Groupon’s stunt. Those using his likeness shouldn’t be either.